The 50K Coalition’s Community College Linkages Action Network Group’s National Forum

EVENT DATE: THURSDAY, MAY 6, 2021
TIME: FROM 11:00 AM – 5:00 PM EASTERN
LOCATION: ONLINE EVENT

Register NOW and don’t miss this excellent opportunity to join the 50K Coalition for a National Forum on promising practices in retention and transfer from community colleges to 4-year engineering programs.  At the National Forum, you will join other members of the 50K Coalition to learn about promising practices, concepts, and tools our nation’s community colleges and four-year schools are implementing to provide black, indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC) and women engineering students pathways to a bachelor’s degree.

Please click the "View Detailed Agenda" button below for the agenda and confirmed speakers. Please share this opportunity with your colleagues or provide the names and contact information of colleagues who may benefit from attending to Gabriel Najera, 50K Community Engagement Manager.

For more information contact, Clif Morgan, 50K Program Director or Gabriel Najera, 50K Community Engagement Manager.

We look forward to your participation!

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National Forum Concurrent Breakout Sessions

During the latter portion of our National Forum, we will convene five concurrent breakout sessions. These sessions will allow attendees to discuss challenges, opportunities, and promising practices for BIPOC and women engineering students in the following areas:

  1. Moving Students from Developmental Math to Calculus in Community Colleges
  2. Outreach, Recruitment, and Scholarships from Four-Year Engineering Schools to Community Colleges
  3. Articulation and Curriculum Consistency between Community Colleges to Four-Year Engineering Schools
  4. Transfer Pathways and Processes: Navigating the Process “On My Own”
  5. Transfer Student Adjustment in Four-Year Colleges

Please read the following breakout session descriptions and select the two breakout sessions you would like to attend. The challenges outlined below will be discussed within each breakout session with particular attention to women and BIPOC engineering students. Before the National Forum, all attendees are asked to view video presentations from thought leaders who draw from research and/or practice experience in each area described below.

We will make every effort to place you in the breakout sessions of your choice.

Four-year colleges and universities generally expect first-year students to enter engineering programs prepared to enroll in Calculus 1, at a minimum. However, many undergraduates in community colleges begin at the Intermediate Algebra or College Algebra level. This population of students is often a population that four-year engineering programs never engage, frequently because so few of them persist to Calculus 1 and never make it “on the radar” of engineering departments. Yet, this population is extremely diverse and can offer an array of perspectives not always represented in four-year institutions... However, if the math deters these collegians, they can be turned away from engineering.

In this breakout, session attendees will discuss and share promising practices to bring those diverse populations from developmental math up to calculus readiness.

NOTE:
To participate in this breakout session, attendees must view a 13-minute presentation STEM Core: Establishing Pathways for Developmental Students to STEM Degrees and Careers by David Gruber, Director, Growth Sectors.

Four-year universities do a great deal in cultivating the interest of students that they care highly about recruiting. We see this in elite Division I programs that are recruiting highly competitive high school athletes. We also see this in four-year academic programs that seek students with SAT scores that are upwards of 1500. However, higher education generally does not see the same type of outreach and recruitment to community college students. Similarly, the types of attractive scholarships directed toward these competitive high school students are not always available for potential transfer students, which is particularly concerning given the higher levels of financial need that these undergraduates often have. What should outreach, recruitment, and scholarships look like from the standpoint of four-year engineering programs to community colleges?

This breakout session will discuss promising student outreach and recruiting practices that four-year engineering programs have implemented or can employ to encourage more community college students to transfer to their institutions.

NOTE:
To participate in this breakout session, attendees must view a 12-minute presentation Outreach, Recruitment, and Scholarships from Four-Year Engineering Schools to Community Colleges by David Knight, Associate Professor, Virginia Tech.

Undergraduates may pay for community college courses that do not always transfer to four-year institutions. Even when they are transferable and adequately articulated, those articulation agreements between the community college and four-year institution can expire at some point.  This situation may result in undergraduates having to retake courses that can set them back as much as a year.

How can community colleges and four-year engineering programs work more collaboratively to create better articulation agreements, stronger communication around curriculum, and potentially shorter time to degrees for students who plan to transfer?

This breakout session will discuss promising practices that community colleges and four-year institutions have created or can implement in the future to support better cross-curricular efforts.

NOTE:

To participate in this breakout session, attendees must view a brief video presentation by Teri Reed, Ph.D., M.B.A. Assistant Vice President for Research Development University of Cincinnati and David De Sousa, PhD. Associate Director of the Texas A&M Engineering Academies, College of Engineering

The transfer process is undeniably critical to move students from community college to four-year institutions. However, transfer can seem very nebulous and confusing, almost like a black hole that leaves students to figure things out “on their own.” What is the responsibility of higher education institutions to create more transparent processes and be more proactive in offering support to undergraduates?

In this breakout session, we will discuss how to make the transfer process more transparent and less confusing for students.

NOTE:
To participate in this breakout session, attendees must view a 13-minute presentation, Transfer Pathways, and Processes: Navigating the Process “On My Own” by Dr. Xueli Wang, Barbara, and Glenn Thompson Professor in Educational Leadership, University of Wisconsin-Madison.

When students transition from a community college to a four-year institution, they enter completely new higher education environments. These include new and often larger campuses, different professors with teaching styles that they are frequently unprepared for, and student communities that have already been formed. In a discipline like engineering, which is already very difficult to manage, this different environment can create completely new stressors.

Moreover, given that many community college students are balancing financial and family requirements that require them to live and work off-campus, they are challenged to navigate a new environment that has been designed for traditional students who live on or near campus. How can four-year engineering programs become more receptive to transfer students and value their lived experiences, rather than making them feel “othered” or isolated?

This breakout session will discuss promising practices that four-year engineering programs can implement or are already implementing to create a culture and climate to promote greater receptivity for transfer students and minimize the challenges of student adjustment.

NOTE:
To participate in this breakout session, attendees must view a 14-minute presentation on Transfer Student Adjustment in Four-Year Colleges by Dr. Andrea M. Ogilvie, Assistant Dean for Student Success & Assistant Professor of Instruction at Texas A&M University.

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Video Submissions

The 50K Coalition is compiling several short 3–5-minute video presentations of promising practices for improving engineering transfer from community college to four-year engineering programs among BIPOC and women, and we want to include you!

Just follow the instructions below to record and submit your video files.

  • Filming can be done using the camera on your smartphone or your computer.
  • Try to avoid filming in front of windows, or else the footage will have white, blown-out backgrounds. Ideally, you will have some light source on your face, be it from a window or desk lamp.
  • The best tip for having good audio is to avoid any distracting background noise. Try to record in a relatively quiet place.
  • Be sure to look directly into the camera. If you're holding your phone to film, try to keep your phone as steady as possible.
  • Please give us a few different takes and review the footage between them to make sure it looks good.

Please answer all of the following questions.  It would be best to restate the questions in your answers (ex. The name of our initiative for improving engineering transfer from community college to four-year engineering programs among BIPOC and women, is ...)

Questions:

  1. Who are you? Yes, we want your name, but who are you in a broad sense? What issues do you identify with, what role do you play at your organization?
  2. Please provide a brief description of the association, community college, university, or diversity group you represent.
  3. What is the name of your initiative for improving engineering transfer from community college to four-year engineering programs among BIPOC and women?
  4. What problem(s) or issue(s) impacting BIPOC and women engineering students' pathways to a bachelor's degree is your initiative addressing?
  5. What are your initiative's intended outcomes or impacts? (e.g., higher retention rates, increased math skills, etc.)
  6. What are the actual outcomes or impacts you have achieved to date? If available, actual statistics would be most valuable. 
  7. Who are the partners who have helped you achieve your initiative's intended outcomes or impact?

After you have successfully made and saved your video please email the file or share a link where we can download the file of your video. If your file is too large to email you can upload the video to a virtual drive like Google Drive, Box, or OneDrive and send a link to gnajera@50kcoalition.org or cmorgan@50kcoalition.org.

A final option is to upload the video to YouTube and share the link from YouTube to one of the email addresses listed above.  For instruction on how to upload videos to YouTube click here.

By submitting your video, you hereby authorize the 50K Coalition to use and edit the submitted video for the sole use in advancing the 50K Coalition's goal of graduating 50,000 BIPOC and women engineering students by 2025.  You agree that the footage may be edited and used in whole or in part for any 50K Coalition-related broadcasting, non-broadcasting, audio/visual, and exhibition purposes in any manner or media.

If You Would Rather Not Submit a Video

We get it.  Not all of us are comfortable being in front of the camera.  The 50K Coalition is still interested in learning about your promising practices for improving engineering transfer from community college to four-year engineering programs among BIPOC and women.  We invite you to answer our questions by taking our survey by clicking on this link.